People

What makes Asia susceptible to fake news?

by Isabella Chua

It’s more than just ignorance.

Crowds of buyers purchasing their groceries in Semarang, Indonesia.

Can the authorities be trusted?

A copy of the letter signed by Dr. Li Wenliang. Credits: Photo by Li Wenliang, letter issued by Wuhan Pubic Security Bureau Wuchang Branch, Public domain.

Social media: Where falsehoods go viral

Indonesians protesting against the 2019 reelection of President Joko Widodo. Their involvement was fuelled by the spread of fake news, on Facebook and WhatsApp, that Widodo favoured the Chinese Indonesian community and was fostering close ties with China. 

A protestor calling for President Moon Jae-in’s impeachment over the scandal. Credits: Cyberdoomslayer / CC BY-SA.

Policing of falsehoods
Solving Asia’s fake news problem
Disclaimer: Our stories have been researched and fact-checked to the best of our abilities. Should you spot mistakes, inaccuracies, or have queries about our sources, please drop us an e-mail at hello@kontinentalist.com
Isabella Chua / Writer

Isabella loves to dig beyond what is ‘commonsensical’ or ‘natural’ to us, by looking at the larger forces (or even accidents), that may have structured these beliefs. A writer at Kontinentalist, she's particularly interested in social issues - religion, crime, identity, and food. While she strives to stay curious about the world by listening to podcasts and taking classes, she's happiest when eating pastries, cakes, and drinking tea.


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