Infrastructure

COVID-19

The turning point for coal in Southeast Asia?

by Zafirah Mohamed Zein

Global demand for coal—one of the world’s biggest and dirtiest sources of energy—is expected to fall by 8 percent this year—a drop that has not been seen since World War II.

In Southeast Asia, the buds of a green energy transition have yet to bloom, but the pandemic is accelerating the region’s move away from coal. Has COVID-19 shown coal the way out?

 

Coal: A brief history
Can the pandemic curb Southeast Asia’s appetite for dirty energy?
Why is it so hard to break with coal?
Dirty energy goes hand in hand with dirty politics
Coal’s gaining a bad rep

A power plant supplying Bali and Java in Indonesia with electricity.

Is there hope for a future powered by renewables?
Disclaimer: Our stories have been researched and fact-checked to the best of our abilities. Should you spot mistakes, inaccuracies, or have queries about our sources, please drop us an e-mail at hello@kontinentalist.com
Zafirah Mohamed Zein / Writer

Zafirah Zein is a writer on the environment and human rights beat. An old soul with restless feet, she is constantly dreaming of time traveling in history or her next adventure out of the city.

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